In Memoriam

Looking back, it appears that sometimes in life, the Divine has picked me up and placed me where I needed to be without my having much to do with it. That’s how I feel about having landed my first full-time job in the office of one W. David Conn, vice provost for academic programs at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo.

At thirty-one, uncertain that I had any marketable skills but in need of a steadier income, I took an administrative assistant job in David’s office. Universities, I would learn, are very hierarchical places, and administrative assistants are near the bottom. I didn’t learn this from David, however.

Instead, when I’d been there only a few months, he asked me to take a crack at rewriting the university mission statement. He didn’t take my work to his meeting with the vice presidents—he took me and my work. I had no idea at the time how unusual this approach was.

David expanded my concept of generosity. When a decision needed to be made, he always focused on how it would affect the students rather than whether it meant more work for him. He championed causes like diversity and student advising when they had no home in the official university structure, not because it was his job but because he was passionate about doing the right thing. And he didn’t say a word the time I almost sent an important university report off without letting the president review it.

When we no longer worked in the same office, I saw him a few times a year to share a meal, and he always brought a tangible joy to the gathering. To be the kind of boss with whom it is easy to have a graceful transition into friendship is no small thing.

David recently passed over to whatever comes after this life, a far too early exit for such a wonderful human being. It’s hard to believe I knew him less than twelve years—his presence in my life and the beauty he brought to it seem larger than could have fit in that time.

Here are some other things I loved about David:

  • His eyes twinkled, never more so than when his grandchildren came to visit.
  • He laughed often.
  • He remained thoroughly British—at least to my American sensibilities—despite having spent most of his adult life in the U.S.
  • He never took himself too seriously. He always said, “The battles in academia are so fierce because the stakes are so low,” even though he was a lifelong academic.
  • He worked hard but maintained a healthy perspective on life. Both for himself and for those he worked with, family always came first.

I’m a better person for having known David. As they say in the Jewish tradition to which he belonged, may his memory be for a blessing. It certainly is for me.

7 thoughts on “In Memoriam

  1. Me too, Joanne. Blessed be. Rachel, I didn’t know he asked you to rewrite the University Mission Statement. And took you to the meeting. Wow. : ) It was a blessing for me to have known him, even a little. And yes, landing in his office. !.

  2. From: Being Finite To: jcarsonlws@yahoo.com Sent: Friday, March 24, 2017 6:55 AM Subject: [New post] In Memoriam #yiv1036799971 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv1036799971 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv1036799971 a.yiv1036799971primaryactionlink:link, #yiv1036799971 a.yiv1036799971primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv1036799971 a.yiv1036799971primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv1036799971 a.yiv1036799971primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv1036799971 WordPress.com | Rachel Henry posted: “Looking back, it appears that sometimes in life, the Divine has picked me up and placed me where I needed to be without my having much to do with it. That’s how I feel about having landed my first full-time job in the office of one W. David Conn, vice pro” | |

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